Miracle for a Dime

“Now seeds are just dimes to the man in the store, and the dimes are the things that he needs. And I’ve been to buy them in seasons before, but have thought of them merely as seeds; but it flashed through my mind as I took them this time, “You purchased a miracle here for a dime.”

Edgar A Guest penned the above lines. The English born American poet lived between 1881 – 1959. I am not sure when he wrote this poem but his lifespan gives you a loose idea of the economics of the time period he lived in. Here in 2016, 135 years after Edgar’s birth, you won’t find seeds for a dime.

mature woman chooses  seeds at store

Having said that, I did pick up some flower seeds the other day for forty-nine cents a package, which is only five dimes. It was in a discount bin of-I’m assuming-expired seed, but for five dimes I took a chance on a miracle.

They say most seeds are viable for three to five years, but I am always hearing of people discovering ancient seed in a tomb and managing to get them to germinate after a few thousand years…which is a lot more than three to five. Keep them in a cool, dry, dark place and most seeds last a very long time.

That said, Rhoda Cutbush of the U.K. managed to resurrect the Crimson Broad Bean after discovering three seeds in a tobacco tin in the corner of a garden shed…hardly the most temperature controlled environment. You can read the post about it here.

Rhoda Cutbush

 

Rhoda Cutbush: Shown here with a handful of the Crimson Broad Beans she helped rescue from extinction is Rhoda Cutbush of England. Rhoda passed away in 2003 at 98 years of age. Photo Credit: Garden Organic

I wonder how the first people felt when they discovered plants produced seed that in turn produced more plants. What a mind blower that must have been. It is still a mind blower. I don’t know of a single gardener who doesn’t think so, even after decades of seeding. You never get jaded. You always look at those specks in your palm and think of all the potential packed in such tiny packages.

And the faith! You drop the seeds into the potting soil, water and patiently wait for the promise to be delivered. There is no overt evidence that the Bonnie Best tomato seed really is a Bonnie Best tomato, but you trust that it is true.

Yesterday I started my tomatoes, cucumbers and an assortment of flowers. Some packets cost three or four dollars and when I opened them up I discovered a mere dozen seeds hiding in a corner. Others were so generously filled I was able to start all I needed and still have plenty to store away for next year.

Tree of Money - Vector Illustration

People store up investments and savings and even gold and silver, but the greatest riches lie in seeds. Open pollinated, non GMO, heirloom seeds that make a miracle out of every planting. You can’t eat gold, but tomatoes and broad beans are a different story. Its a reality that the folks at Monsanto were clever enough to recognize. If that bothers you there are lots of ways to protest; write letters, join rallies and boycott GMO products to name just a few.

However, the biggest and most radical thing you can do to stop the food giant in its tracks, is to simply save your own seeds. It’s a lot better for your blood pressure too. Letters and rallies can make you crazy, but planting and harvesting your own vegetables is all about health and spending quality time with nature. It is the most peaceful and productive of protests.

Saving seed

Winner, winner, vegetable dinner!

If you are interested in saving seeds Seed to Seed by Suzanne Ashworth now in its second edition is a great read…

seed saving book

If you can’t save your own seed, but still want to grow your own vegetables, it makes sense to keep at least a years supply on hand from your favourite open pollinated, heirloom seed supplier. To find such suppliers check out the Online Catalogues tab at the top of the page.

Thanks for reading this and happy planting!

Close-up of child holding dirt with plant

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